COVID-19 Corona Virus
South African Resource Portal
COVID-19 Corona Virus
South African Resource Portal
COVID-19 Corona Virus
South African Resource Portal
 
Submit an article to Indago - a peer reviewed journal
Submit an article to Indago - a peer reviewed journal
Submit an article to Indago - a peer reviewed journal

The language of visual art is an exhibition based on the Grade 10 visual art curriculum with a special focus on the formal elements of art, curated from the Permanent Collection of Oliewenhuis Art Museum. The formal elements of art are seen as the building blocks of creating an artwork and consists of eight visual parts: line, form, shape, colour, texture, tonal value, space and movement.

A visually stimulating display from the Permanent Collection of Oliewenhuis Art Museum was curated to bring both enjoyment to the viewer while simultaneously educating them about crucial elements that make an artwork remarkable. An artist includes the visual elements in order to entice the viewer with visual clues, and this exhibition was based on that concept and spontaneously unfolded into an exciting, pleasurable exhibition.

The language of visual art represents South African artists and artworks from the Permanent Collection of Oliewenhuis Art Museum. This exhibition is an amalgamation of visual and tangible textures to be witnessed by the work of Adriaan de Villiers, the striking use of colour and expressionist mark making of Pauline Gutter, line, colour, concept and composition that is captured in the work of Lucky Sibiya, the portrayal of shape and space in the work of Sandile Goje and lastly tonal value, grey scale and perspective that is mastered by Ben Botma.

The remarkable aspect of this exhibition is that it speaks to a larger audience than just the Grade 10 learner. It is a visual celebration of artworks that is rarely on show. Being educated about the formal elements of art is not only for the school learner, but for any person that is interested to learn more about art.

Please book a guided tour for yourself, your learners or a group of friends. This is free of charge and we accommodate small groups according to the current Covid-19 lockdown level. For more information contact the Education Officer, Yolanda de Kock on yolanda@nasmus.co.za or call Oliewenhuis Art Museum at 051 011 0525 (ext 200).

Oliewenhuis Art Museum is located at 16 Harry Smith Street, Bloemfontein. The visiting hours during Level 1 is from Monday to Friday between 09:00 and 15:00, Saturdays between 10:00 and 15:00 and closed on Sundays and public holidays. Entrance is free and secure parking is available for visitors and for buses. A ramp at the entrance of the main entrance provides access for wheel chairs, while a lift provides access to the Permanent Collection display areas on the first floor.

𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙋𝙚𝙧𝙢𝙖𝙣𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝘾𝙤𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙘𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣 housed at Oliewenhuis is an outstanding collection of South African art, which includes the Blind Alphabet, an artwork created specifically for the sight-impaired, as well as the Cement and Mosaic Sculptures in the gardens. Oliewenhuis Art Museum has shown a steady and interesting growth in its collection since 1989 and the Permanent Collection currently comprises 1397 artworks, all by South African artists. As part of the Art Museum’s vision to enrich people’s knowledge, understanding and appreciation of South Africa’s cultural heritage, the exhibitions on the first floor (where part of the Permanent Collection is exhibited) are frequently rearranged and exchanged with artworks from the storerooms.

The Sculpture Park, comprising 16 sculptures by various South African sculptors, is the only one of its kind in the Free State.

The African Carousel focuses on introducing children to the concept of art in an unintimidating, fun way.

Free Admission to the Main Building (Permanent Collection and all the exhibitions), the Reservoir, and the gardens.

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