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Category

History

Category

If you want to build a prosperous and peaceful country, especially in a post-conflict and diverse society like South Africa, it is essential to strive for unity andreconciliation. The constitution of South Africa encourages all South Africans, irrespective of race or creed, to strive for mutual respect, social cohesion and reconciliation. This includes respect for each other’s identity, our diversity and our shared heritage. The Preamble of our Constitution states:

Most South Africans with a reasonable knowledge of their motherland’s recent history will have heard of Bram Fischer. A substantial percentage of them will certainly be able to mention that he is a struggle hero comparable to the likes of Joe Slovo and Walter Sisulu. Mention the name Molly Fischer, however, and chances are that most people will never have heard of her. She was none other than Bram Fischer’s wife and during her relatively short life (1908-1964) she was as committed to the liberation struggle as her famous husband was.

For over three centuries Robben Island, an offshore island within sight of the City of Cape Town, was used by successive governments as a penal settlement and isolation centre. Its detention centres served to safeguard the surrounding society. From the outset the island’s institutions followed a treatment regime that was harsh. During the apartheid years (1948 – 1994), it served as the primary place of detention for anti-apartheid activists who fought for the overthrow of the minority-ruled state.

Digaretene and the 1947 royal visit in Bloemfontein: an oral history overview

he narrative of Digaretene in Bochabela Township, East of Bloemfontein, dated back to 1947 when the British Royal family – King George VI, his wife Queen Elizabeth and their two daughters, Princess Elizabeth (the current Queen Elizabeth) and Princess Margaret – visited South Africa.

King George VI and his Royal family visited Bloemfontein as part of their tour of South Africa. The reason for the visit was to thank South Africa for the support that the country gave Britain during the Second World War [WWII]. The Municipality of Bloemfontein organized the construction of 24 houses, 12 built in Abdurahman Street and 12 built in Nyokong Street.