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Category

Palaeontology

Category

Date: 9 April 2019, Bloemfontein

The National Museum, Bloemfontein today unveiled the complete skull and skeleton of Tapinocaninus, which was a 3-metre long dinocephalian, an ancient ancestor of mammals.

The specimen is the most complete dinocephalian yet discovered and has been beautifully prepared by the University of the Witwatersrand. The fossil was loaned to the University as several blocks of rocks 29 years ago. It has now been returned to the National Museum as a fully prepared specimen, which will soon be placed on exhibit. A month ago, Bruce Rubidge, Romalo Govender and Marco Romano published the full skeletal description of Tapinocaninus in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology.

Figure 1. Browsers (e.g. giraffe) and grazers (e.g. zebra) by using different diet niches (photo courtesy J Codron).

Large mammal herbivores are among the most conspicuous elements of terrestrial landscapes. We South Africans all appreciate herbivores as flagships of our country’s natural heritage, enjoying them as food, for sport hunting, or simply for our holiday viewing pleasure. They are an exceptionally diverse animal group, represented by over 100 species on the African continent alone, ranging in size from the 3 kg rock dassie Procavia capensis to the African elephant Loxodonta africana with an average body mass around 4 000 kg (Codron 2013). How such a diversity of forms evolved, and still co-exist today, is nothing short of remarkable.

A new species of a giant dinosaur has been found in South Africa’s Free State Province. The plant-eating dinosaur, named Ledumahadi mafube, weighed 12 tonnes and stood about four metres high at the hips. Ledumahadi mafube was the largest land animal alive on Earth when it lived, nearly 200 million years ago. It was roughly double the size of a large African elephant. National Museum’s Dr Jennifer Botha- Brink, is the co- author of the article which was published in Current Biology.